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Learning & Laughing in South Africa!


Learning & Laughing in South Africa!
Its Not Wine Its SA Grape Juice Traveling around the world is not only fun, but also very educational. Our family recently took a trip to South Africa to visit Johannesburg and Capetown. We spent approximately 10 days touring around S. Africa and visited museums, gardens, sandy beaches, etc.  DJ & TJ wearing African Masks Over the course of our stay, we learned so much! But more importantly, our son DJ, was able to learn through the activities we engaged in and through interactions with an older peer model. We were able to have educational moments in geography as we taught him about the differences between continents, countries, and cities as we compared our travels from North America to Africa. DJ's curiosity was sparked as we toured the national botanical gardens. He read about the plant life (with assistance of course) and explored the insect life and their ecosystem. Additionally, he was full of questions about the rhinos, ostriches, and wildebeests from the s
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Ghana's Immigration is No Joke! But We Laughed!

Ghana's Immigration is No Joke! But We Laughed!

We know many potential repatriates are concerned about residency policies in African countries. Most of us are leery about leaving America to settle in Africa and not being able to stay. So, this week we decided to take a trip to the immigration office to get some information on the ability of Africans born in America to reside permanently in Ghana.  Our experience at the immigration office was very comical. Let's just say that when we started seeking this information, we realized that either you pay someone to get the real information or you will get the runaround. We showed up at the office and the first observation was that there were more white and Lebanese people in the office than anyone else. Once we informed the receptionist of our intentions, she directed us to another building to get our questions answered. Little did we know we would leave immigration and still wouldn’t have our simple question of, "We want to know what the requirements are to acquire right

Plans? What Plans?

Plans? What Plans?

Prior to our arrival, we were told by a good friend, “Any plans you have for your move to Ghana, more than likely will eventually change.” We didn’t exactly laugh at the idea, but we didn’t take it all that serious either. Over the course of first few days, this statement came to fruition. As our son, DJ, played in the soccer field with a newly acquired friend, brother Prince discussed with us the vision he has for Africans born in America. The vision of claiming your piece of the African pie by owning land and building a home. The very first thought was, “we didn’t plan on purchasing land at this time.” We had a plan and we planned on sticking to it. Our plan was simple. Get a rental, apartment or house, and live here for a year or two before we purchased and built our own place. Discussing plans in Aburi Gardens The thought of coming here and diving straight into the land purchasing process for the purposes of building a home was not something we desired, due to all the horr

Fellowship and Dumsor

Fellowship and Dumsor

On January 31, 2017, the Parks family arrived at the Kotoka International airport. For you all who don’t know what that means, it means we made it to Ghana and completed the repatriation process. We finally made it home! @Palace Afrika with Future Repats As one may expect, it was a joyous occasion to return to the motherland. It is hard to explain with words the emotions my wife and I felt as we touched down in Ghana to continue our journey. Being in Ghana is totally different from being in America and having to find our footing in a new land is a very scary feeling. Even when you think you are totally prepared and ready it can still be an overwhelming experience. When we arrived in Ghana the people, with their nurturing spirits and friendly smiles, welcomed us home with open arms.  As we exited the plane and headed to customs, the first Ghanaian sister working the immigration desk smiled as she yelled to us, “Bra! Bra! Akwabaa.” In the local language (Twi), this simply means,

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