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Travel with Kids: Helpful Tips


Travel with Kids: Helpful Tips
Traveling is an exciting, educational, and relaxing part of our lives. We've met so many people along the way that believe once you have children, it becomes impossible to travel. People have so many reasons as to why they can't imagine doing what we are  currently doing with our son.  There are so many concerns you don’t have to consider or worry about when it’s just you and your friends, your significant other, or best of all, by your lonesome. Throw the kiddos in the mix, and travel changes completely but its more than doable!  We are living proof that kids don’t have to cramp your travel goals and or style. Here are a few pointers we have learned along our journey through Africa with our little road warrior. Family taking a boat ride in Rabat, Morocco.   1.      Take late night flights if possible (likely that kids will sleep the entire flight or at least most of the flight). 2.      Bring earplugs and/or gum for the takeoffs and landings to help with the
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Cape Verde: Want to live in a Paradise?

Cape Verde: Want to live in a Paradise?

Our recent stop on our journey across Africa landed us in the Cape Verde Islands. The country is located off the coast of Senegal and consist of 10 islands, 9 which are inhabited. During our travels, our goal to access whether we could live in particular country requires us to look into immigration. We were able to obtain the following information regarding immigrating to the Cape Verde islands and/or acquiring a visa for a visit.  Visas Visiting Cape Verde requires an American citizen to purchase a tourist visa. The single entry visa is approximately 25 euros (approximately $28 USD) obtained upon arrival at one of the international airports of Cape Verde; American citizens can get a visa for $60 USD if obtained through the Cape Verde Embassy in the USA; The visa is valid for 90 days (only 30 days if you get visa upon arrival in Santiago); An multi-entry visa for 6 months can be obtained (price different from single entry); Your passport must be valid for at leas

Be mindful of the little ones!

Be mindful of the little ones!

Packing up to make a huge move from one continent to another continent is very intimidating for many people. To be frank, everyone is not capable of making such a move. With an international move, there can be some major sacrifices one has to consider. Where will I live? How will I earn income? How will I make new friends? Can I live in a country with a different language? Can I adjust/assimilate to the new culture? Starting over from scratch and often rebuilding the essentials of one’s life is not desirable. In addition, for some, there are concerns about leaving family behind and not being able to see them regularly. It takes a special kind of person to want to change every aspect of their lives. The decision to make such a move becomes even more scary when you have to take into account the feelings and desires of other individuals, especially a child. Having Lunch in Sao Vicente, Cape Verde  As parents, we could not just pack our bags and move without explaining to our 4-y

Is Cote d' Ivoire for you?

Is Cote d' Ivoire for you?

With our recent visit to Cote d’ Ivoire, we were attempting to discover how we as foreigners could move to and possibly live in the country. Obtaining information on Cote d’Ivoire was challenging work due to the language barrier. However, from our experience in the country, these are just a few things we found out and feel you should know about Cote D’ Ivoire. Visas: U.S. citizens must have a visa to travel to Cote d’Ivoire. Visas last for up to 3 months. Obtaining a visa must be done through the Cote d’ Ivoire embassy which is located in Washington D.C. If you are outside of the U.S., check to see if the country you are in has a local embassy for Cote d’Ivoire. Applications for a visa can be taken into the office or done via mail. There is a fee of $150 USD for the E-Visa. This must be paid on the U.S Cote d’Ivoire embassy website and the receipt must be included with the application. If you can go in person, you can pay a smaller fee of $62 USD and take the application in

Cote D'Ivoire, Auvoire!

Cote D'Ivoire, Auvoire!

For those who are thinking of moving to Africa, Cote D’Ivoire is not a bad choice. The country was under attack no more than 6 years ago as France imposed its political will on the country in 2011. Considering that Cote D’ivoire was engulfed in a major war with the French and most of the infrastructure destroyed, the country has made a lot progress in rebuilding itself. The development is occurring slowly and mainly in the capital Abidjan. The sad part is the development is occurring around those living in poverty with little to no concern about meeting the needs of those living there. The major concern for many Ivorians is the need to avoid more conflict over the next couple of years while they try to rebuild. Through ventures with Morocco, Tunisia, Lebanon, France, and other nations, major projects such as revamping the waterfront lagoon, building a university, and numerous real estate ventures are taking place. Hopefully, the country will also focus on building in other areas of th

Parlez Vous Anglais?

Parlez Vous Anglais?

It’s been almost two weeks since we arrived in Abidjan and I’m still unsure if we are supposed to call it Ivory Coast or Cote D’ivoire. Anyhow, We had never heard anything about Cote D’Ivoire prior to our visit, however, we were excited to see what the country had to offer. As we flew into the country, we saw the sheer beauty of this West African country. From the lush landscape to the beautiful beaches. From above it was breathtaking. Once we landed, we collected our belongings and we were off to explore one of West African’s most developed cities, Abidjan.  Word to the wise, get to know some Ivorians before to plan a visit to Cote D’ivoire, especially if you don’t know French. We arrived with no ability to speak the primary language and really no plan of what we would be doing during out three week stay. Not the best move on our part, but you live, you learn, and we figured we could just use the internet to formulate a game plan. Day one in Abidjan was quite interest

Our 2 Cents on "Togo"

Our 2 Cents on "Togo"

Recently, our family decided to pay a visit to Lomé, Togo. Togo was never a place we considered moving too. However, after our visit to Ghana is seemed like the next moved would be to visit Ghana’s French speaking neighbor. Visiting a place is no way indicative of living in that place. Thus, our visit to Togo was one which we knew we would not be able to provide much insight on what life is like in Togo from a residence’s point of view. However, we used our time wisely and we acquired as much information as we could. When were arrived at the Ghana/Togo border, we were met with a warm welcome. The Togolese people are very helpful and friendly. People were patience with us and tried to help us overcome the language barrier. Unfortunately, we didn’t have a contact in Togo when we first arrived so we spent the first day trying to figure out what to do with ourselves. If we would have left it up to DJ, we would have ridden motorbikes all days and for the entire trip. On our second day

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